MONGOLIA'S TOP 10

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1. TERELJ NATIONAL PARK

Terelj National Park is located 55 km away from Ulaanbaatar city. It’s a great stop for travelers who are in Mongolia on a short trip. There is plenty to do in the National Park such as hiking in the carved mountains, stopping at the “Turtle Rock,” visiting the “Aryapal” meditation center, visiting a nomadic family, riding horses or camels. Due to its proximity to Ulaanbaatar, paved road and beautifully carved mountains, it is one of the favorite spots for many, including local travelers.

Tours that we offer in Terelj National Park

terelj
naadam

2. NAADAM FESTIVAL

Naadam is the biggest and one of widely celebrated festivals, started from Chinggis Khan’s time. Naadam means “game” in Mongolian and the festival focuses on three sports events: wrestling, horse racing and archery. It is the best time to visit Mongolia immerse in the culture, people and its traditions.

 

Tours that we offer during Naadam festival:

2. NAADAM FESTIVAL

Naadam is the biggest and one of widely celebrated festivals, started from Chinggis Khan’s time. Naadam means “game” in Mongolian and the festival focuses on three sports events: wrestling, horse racing and archery. It is the best time to visit Mongolia immerse in the culture, people and its traditions.

 

Tours that we offer during Naadam festival:

naadam

3. KHUVSGUL LAKE

Known as the Blue Pearl of Mongolia, Khuvsgul lake is the deepest and the second most voluminous freshwater lake in Central Asia. It holds almost 70% of Mongolia’s fresh water and 0.4% of all the freshwater in the world. It is surrounded by beautiful high mountains, trails and a breathtaking view. Khuvsgul is also known for Raindeer people, shamanism and smoked fish.

 

Tours that we offer in Khuvsgul lake

khovsgol
reindeer-people

4. THE REINDEER PEOPLE

Also known as the Tsaatan, the reindeer herding community in Tsagaanuur soum. Tsaatan people have their own unique language and customs. Instead of living in a traditional ger, they live in tipis. Shaman practices are well known among Tsaatan community.
This tour is challenging, many hours of driving north and some parts are only accessible by horseback. Please contact to arrange this trip.

 

Tours that we offer in Tsagaanuur soum

4. THE REINDEER PEOPLE

Also known as the Tsaatan, the reindeer herding community in Tsagaanuur soum. Tsaatan people have their own unique language and customs. Instead of living in a traditional ger, they live in tipis. Shaman practices are well known among Tsaatan community.
This tour is challenging, many hours of driving north and some parts are only accessible by horseback. Please contact to arrange this trip.

 

Tours that we offer in Tsagaanuur soum

reindeer-people

5. TSENKHER HOT SPRING

Tsenkher hot spring is the second hottest spring in Mongolia, water heat reaches 86C degree. The hot spring has hydrosulfuric acid and silica union, and people use it for medical treatment. You can drink the water in a small dose or bath for a specific amount of time for treatment. Tsenkher hot spring is good for digestive system, restores immunity, rheumatism, neuralgia, and muscular pain.

 

Tours that we offer that includes Tsenkher hot spring

tsenkher-hot-springs
mongolian-ger

6. MONGOLIAN GER

Ger has been the main habitation of Mongolia for thousands of years and continues to be the main form of dwelling in the countryside. Ger is warm enought to keep the coldest winter temperatures at bay and strong enough to withstand strong winds and the demands of a whole family. Ger is secure, weather proof, easy to build, enviromental friendly, and long lashing.

6. MONGOLIAN GER

Ger has been the main habitation of Mongolia for thousands of years and continues to be the main form of dwelling in the countryside. Ger is warm enought to keep the coldest winter temperatures at bay and strong enough to withstand strong winds and the demands of a whole family. Ger is secure, weather proof, easy to build, enviromental friendly, and long lashing.
mongolian-ger

7. KHUSTAI NATIONAL PARK

The takhi wild horses native to the grassy steppes had vanished from the wild in the 1970s, but as a result of various breeding programs, they slowly reappeared in their old stomping grounds, including their original home: the Khustain Nuruu national park. The takhi (officially named Przewalski’s horse after the Russian explorer who first spotted it), may be the world’s last truly wild horse. While most “wild” horses around the globe are domesticated horses gone feral, the Przewalski’s horse was never domesticated. Up until the 18th century, these short stocky horses freely roamed the steppes of Mongolia, Kazakhstan, and Russian Siberia. But then the numbers started dwindling. In 1967, the last herd of takhi was spotted and in 1969, the last individual horse.
They were declared “extinct in the wild,” which remained the status quo for nearly 30 years. There were only 13 surviving takhi horses, kept in different zoos around the world. They were bred carefully, and the population slowly increased to more than 1,500 at which point they were reintroduced into the wild. The downside of this method is that the genetic pool of all the existing horses is limited. One of the places where the reintroduction took place in 1992 was the horse’s native habitat of Khustain Nuruu or Hustai National Park. A year later the park, which stretches across 50,000 hectares, was declared as a Specially Protected Area. Its key mission is to maintain and build a sustainable population of these rare creatures. Visitors to the park can now spot teams of the dun-colored horse wandering around the dry grassy landscape. Although the star of Khustain Nuruu is indubitably the takhi, the park is also home to other species like the red deer, steppe gazelle, the Eurasian badger, grey wolves, and the Eurasian lynx.

Know Before You Go

Khustain National Park is located 60 miles west of Ulaanbaatar, the Mongolian capital city. Public transport can drop the occasional visitor nearby the park, but a private car would certainly come in handy given the size of the park. Accommodation can be found inside the park itself, but several camps are scattered throughout the area.
tsenkher-hot-springs
Herd of horses in the mongolian prairie

8. NOMADIC LIFE CULTURE

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.

8. NOMADIC LIFE CULTURE

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.
Herd of horses in the mongolian prairie

9. KHONGOR SAND DUNES AKA SINGING DUNES

One of Mongolia’s most visited spots are the Great Gobi Desert that extends over 1.3 million square km (500,002 sq mi). Standing 100 km from Yol Valley is Mongolia’s largest sand dunes, the Khongor sand dunes. Unlike the Sahara desert, a vast land filled with sand dunes, Gobi has shrubs and gravel cover most parts of the region, and Khongor is one of the few areas with sand dunes. Khongor sand dunes got its singing dunes name from the sound that is created from the movement of the fine sand as the wind blows across the desert. The sound of nature can be music to one’s ear as you listen peacefully to the grains of sand sliding down the magnificent landscape. When in Southgobi, one must not miss this sweet spot.
khongor-sand-dunes
eagle-festival

10. EAGLE FESTIVAL

The Golden Eagle Festival or Eagle Festival is an annual traditional festival held in Bayan-Ölgii province.In the eagle festival, Kazakh eagle hunters celebrate their heritage and compete to catch small animals such as foxes and hares with specially trained eagles, showing off the skills both of the birds and their trainers. Prizes are awarded for speed, agility and accuracy, as well as for the best traditional Kazakh dress.
The Eagle Festival is held during the first weekend in October, run by the Mongolian Eagle Hunter's Association. Dark, rocky mountainous terrain forms the backdrop to the festivities, which incorporate an opening ceremony, parade, cultural exhibitions, demonstrations and handcrafts in the centre of the town of Ölgii, followed by sporting activities and competitions outside of town towards the mountains. Other sporting activities include horse racing, archery and the highly entertaining Bushkashi - goatskin tug of war on horseback.
The Eagle Festival is featured in the 2016 documentary The Eagle Huntress, in which the 13-year-old Kazakh girl Aisholpan becomes the first female to enter and win the competition.

10. EAGLE FESTIVAL

The Golden Eagle Festival or Eagle Festival is an annual traditional festival held in Bayan-Ölgii province.In the eagle festival, Kazakh eagle hunters celebrate their heritage and compete to catch small animals such as foxes and hares with specially trained eagles, showing off the skills both of the birds and their trainers. Prizes are awarded for speed, agility and accuracy, as well as for the best traditional Kazakh dress.
The Eagle Festival is held during the first weekend in October, run by the Mongolian Eagle Hunter's Association. Dark, rocky mountainous terrain forms the backdrop to the festivities, which incorporate an opening ceremony, parade, cultural exhibitions, demonstrations and handcrafts in the centre of the town of Ölgii, followed by sporting activities and competitions outside of town towards the mountains. Other sporting activities include horse racing, archery and the highly entertaining Bushkashi - goatskin tug of war on horseback.
The Eagle Festival is featured in the 2016 documentary The Eagle Huntress, in which the 13-year-old Kazakh girl Aisholpan becomes the first female to enter and win the competition.
eagle-festival